744 ICEBERG!!!

Chris is back from his travels to the east coast of Greenland and to Donegal, the northwest part of Ireland. On today’s episode Bob asks about shooting trains with reflective elements and John has a tip (coating tripod feet against corrosion) and a question about photo exercises that give you some real exercise. Chris also talks about shooting huge icebergs in Greenland and how to process those images.


RECEIVE EMAIL FOR NEW EPISODES

Links:

Photo tours with Chris Marquardt:
» Sep 2016: Donegal
» Feb 2017: Lake Baikal, Siberia
» May 2017: Svalbard/Spitzbergen
» Nov 2017: Bhutan
» all photo tours

tfttf736 – Crunchy Legs

On this episode Frank has a question about protecting his tripod investment, Tim can’t decide which tilt-shift lens to buy and we’ll take an interdisciplinary look into how the job of a music mixing engineer isn’t that much different from someone who’s editing photos.


RECEIVE EMAIL FOR NEW EPISODES

Links:

Photo tours with Chris Marquardt:
» Sep 2016: Donegal
» Feb 2017: Lake Baikal, Siberia
» May 2017: Svalbard/Spitzbergen
» Nov 2017: Bhutan
» all photo tours

How good can you operate your camera upside-down?

We’re lucky that we have access to one of the best views during the Toronto Urban Photography workshop. The roof on the building that Sean Galbraith lives in reveals a stunning skyline…

…and a high ledge that my tripod is just a little bit too short for.

Well okay, it’s not too short, but in order to get a proper view of the city, I’d have to fully extend the middle column which for a 2-second exposure is a bit too shaky. So in order to be able to peek over the side and have a solid and stable foundation for longer exposures, I have last year decided to completely collapse the legs of the tripod (very stable!) and hang the camera upside down under it (low center of gravity, also very stable).

Tripiod upside down

As you see, the only potential problem with the setup is that right behind the edge of the railing comes an eleven floor drop, which is why I had the stap hanging this way. During the exposure and the setup, my arm was always through the loop. There was also no wind and no real chance of the tripod being bumped, and the rubber feet did a great job holding it in place. Still, just the slightest bit scary.

But in the end it was worth doing it like that:

Toronto Skyline

What are your unconventional tripod setups?

Photo tours with Chris Marquardt:
» Sep 2016: Donegal
» Feb 2017: Lake Baikal, Siberia
» May 2017: Svalbard/Spitzbergen
» Nov 2017: Bhutan
» all photo tours